Agent Orange Linked to Increased Risk of Prostate Cancer

As men age, their risk of developing prostate cancer increases. Aging Vietnam veterans are giving researchers new opportunities to solidify the connection between in-country exposure to Agent Orange and subsequent prostate cancer development. In a study presented today during the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) in Orlando, researchers presented data from a large study of veterans enrolled in the Northern California VA System, examining prostate cancer incidence and disease characteristics in those exposed to Agent Orange compared to those who were not exposed.

In a study first presented during the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) in May 2008 and published in the September 15 issue of the journal Cancer, researchers examined prostate cancer incidence and disease characteristics in those exposed to Agent Orange compared to those who were not exposed. They found that twice as many men exposed to Agent Orange were identified with prostate cancer. Agent Orange-exposed men were also diagnosed younger and were more likely to present with aggressive or metastatic disease. Other prostate cancer risk factors – race, body-mass index (BMI) and smoking – were not statistically different between the two groups.

This increased evidence suggests that exposure to Agent Orange should be considered a risk factor for developing prostate cancer, similar to African-American heritage or a family history of the disease.

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References:

source: American Urology Association, Newswise

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