Example of goals, Sub-goals, and Indicators

Overall goals, sub-goals and indicators are usually presented together. The following table is an example of how overall goals, sub-goals and indicators can be integrated.

Goal 1

Sub goals

Indicator

To reduce health risks to sensitive groups of people arising from PCB contamination

1.1To minimize health risks of residents living adjacent to the SEDCW site.

By year 2015, reduce daily exposure to PCBs to the lowest acceptable level (i.e., HQ<0.2) or monitor success of implementing specific risk management approaches (to be determined).

  1.2To minimize health risks of workers and trainers working elsewhere on the EDC compound. By year 2015, reduce daily exposure to PCBs to the lowest acceptable level (i.e. HQ <0.2) or minotir implemting specfic risk management approaches (to be determined)
  1.3To minimize health risk of workers working in the SEDCW site

By 2015, reduce daily exposure to PCBs to the lowest acceptable level (i.e., HQ<0.2) or monitor success of implementing specific risk management approaches (to be determined).

Goal 2

Sub goals

Indicator

To avoid or, when avoidance is not feasible, minimize uncontrolled releases of PCB hazardous materials or accidents (including explosion and fire) during their handling, storage and use.

2.1 To establish hazardous materials management action plans to address potential chemical hazards, exposure pathways and potential receptors identified through human health risk assessment.

By year 2015, the national hazardous materials management priorities plan is in place and effectively enforced.

2.2 Where practicable, to avoid or minimize the use of hazardous materials (for example, replacing PCBs in electrical equipment by non-PCB substitutes).

By year 2015, PCB oil or PCB contaminated oils are no longer in use in all transformers and capacitors.

2.3 To prevent uncontrolled releases of PCBs and other hazardous chemicals to the environment or uncontrolled reactions that might result in fire or explosion.

By 2015, proper containment facilities are in place and properly operated and maintained.

2.4 To Implement management controls (procedures, inspections, communications, training, and drills) to address residual risks that have not been (or cannot be) prevented or controlled through appropriate risk management measures.

By 2015, management control activities – procedures, inspections, communication, training and drills – are conducted regularly.

Improperly Stored Pesticides
Source: FAO
Hatfield Consultants The World Bank funded by the Canadian POPs Trust Fund through the      
Canadian International Development Agency
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